International Women's Day 2024

We promote gender equality

Iberdrola Group, which assumes as its own the challenges of United Nations Sustainable Development Goal number 5 (gender equality), one more year put its weighs behind this event as part of its commitment to equal opportunities.

International Women's Day 2024
Iberdrola has a firm commitment to equality.

"Invest in women: Accelerate progress" is the slogan chosen by the United Nations to commemorate International Women's Day. The Iberdrola Group is committed to promoting the presence of women in careers related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics. From Spain to Australia, these are some of the company's female employees who contribute to driving the energy transition and business development from positions related to digital transformation and innovation.
 

In the first person: 

Margarita Fernández de Prada

Digital Transformation Director in Iberdrola

“The challenge of leading the digital transformation of the Iberdrola Group is both an exciting opportunity and an immense responsibility. I am fortunate to have a team of excellent professionals, passionate about their work, to achieve our goals”.  

Margarita Fernández de Prada

Digital Transformation Director in Iberdrola

“At the beginning of my professional career, there were few women working in the world of technology, even fewer in the world of innovation and even fewer in positions of responsibility. Innovation requires creativity and diversity, questioning ways of the past and exploring new paths. What better way than to involve different people in this process who enrich the creative process from different points of view”.

Arantxa Ortiz Marina

Data Analytics Director. Iberdrola Innovation Middle East

Arantxa Ortiz Marina

Data Analytics Director. Iberdrola Innovation Middle East

Leire Eseverri

Maintenance technician at the Elgea-Urkilla wind farm

“A few years ago the sector was purely male and now we are starting to see women in the sector. There are still very few of us, but I think we are more than capable of doing any job in this sector. At Iberdrola, thanks to a multitude of STEIM programmes, careers and technological studies are promoted among women. The company is committed to this. We have to encourage the new generations that technical studies are for both genders”.

 

Leire Eseverri

Maintenance technician at the Elgea-Urkilla wind farm

“Access to innovation and new technologies enhances my scope of practice in this accelerating transition to clean energy. By meaningful engagement with local communities to ensure equal access to education for women and girls, we can create clearer pathways and inclusive workplaces for women in insurance, technology and engineering”.

Leia Wijeratne

Insurance Manager. Iberdrola Australia

Leia Wijeratne

Insurance Manager. Iberdrola Australia

Rosa María Carrasco 

Head of Technologies, Control, Information and Communication Systems. Iberdrola México  

“We have to be prepared for the opportunities that come our way, take the initiative on certain occasions and not be afraid of the challenges that arise. When I started studying Computer Systems Engineering, there were only four of us girls! The fact that there are more women working in technical fields helps a lot. I saw it as a challenge and now it's more attainable. It's good to have personal and professional goals. I have achieved one: to be head of an area traditionally led by men”. 

Rosa María Carrasco 

Head of Technologies, Control, Information and Communication Systems. Iberdrola México  

“This world is evolving rapidly toward digital solutions that will shape the new future, and I am committed to using my knowledge, skills, and ambition to advance the data science field and produce smart systems to address industrial challenges. Being a data scientist, I would like to inspire and encourage women all over the globe to pursue careers in this exciting and impactful field”.  

Imene Mechter 

Data Scientist (PhD). Iberdrola Innovation Middle East 

Imene Mechter 

Data Scientist (PhD). Iberdrola Innovation Middle East 

Briar Blount

Legal Counsel. Iberdrola Australia

“I also form part of Iberdrola Australia’s sustainability working group and the Women in Energy Network, which has successfully hosted its’ first networking event. Technology has enabled me to better connect with colleagues, counterparties and clients, whilst also allowing me to work efficiently and effectively at home and the office. In my experience, flexible and hybrid working conditions improve work-life balance and increase productivity”.  

Briar Blount

Legal Counsel. Iberdrola Australia

“El equipo de Customer Experience & Retention de Iberdrola Clienti Italia es íntegramente femenino. La transformación digital ha provocado cambios en la forma en la que interactuamos con los consumidores: gracias a las herramientas digitales es más fácil establecer un contacto directo y efectivo. ¡La tecnología y lo digital son nuestros aliados y representan un campo de juego neutral donde las mujeres pueden competir en igualdad de condiciones con los hombres!”.

Valentina Barone 

Responsable del equipo de Customer Experience & Retention en Iberdrola Clienti Italia  

Valentina Barone 

Responsable del equipo de Customer Experience & Retention en Iberdrola Clienti Italia  

Samantha Subar 

Customer Journey & Marketing. Avangrid  

“Iberdrola Clienti Italia's Customer Experience & Retention team is entirely female. It is focused on understanding customer needs in order to build long-lasting relationships, increase customer satisfaction and profitability. Digital transformation has brought about changes in the way we interact with consumers: thanks to digital tools it is easier to establish direct and effective contact. Technology and digital are our allies and represent a neutral playing field where women can compete on equal terms with men!”.  

Samantha Subar 

Customer Journey & Marketing. Avangrid  

“You know when a man accidentally enters the women's underground car* and slowly realises that there is something strange going on around him? Being a woman in innovation environments is similar. I think by challenging people's mindsets, we challenge the status quo. And it's very rewarding and a great responsibility to be able to inspire and open paths for all the women who are entering this market, especially in the energy sector”. 

Luiza Cohem 

Innovation Manager. Neoenergia

Luiza Cohem 

Innovation Manager. Neoenergia

Noemí Valiente 

Head of the Territorial Maintenance Unit of i-DE  

"Women's careers must be made visible so that they can serve as an example to society, and above all to girls and young women, to educate them in equality and to tell them that they, like them, can be and do whatever they choose. We need mirrors in which we can see ourselves reflected, which can serve as a stimulus and allow us to move forward. We have to give women a voice and make them visible in their professional environment and highlight their successes".

Noemí Valiente 

Head of the Territorial Maintenance Unit of i-DE  

"I am responsible for ensuring that every business in the UK manages its cyber security risks. I have been working in this field for almost 27 years and I am more passionate about it than ever. The challenge landscape is constantly changing. I love the challenge of having to constantly evolve to ensure we continue to protect our key assets".

Lynda McQuilken 

Chief Information Security Officer (CISO). ScottishPower  

Lynda McQuilken 

Chief Information Security Officer (CISO). ScottishPower  

Farzana Kausar 

Cybersecurity Engineer. ScottishPower   

"I joined the ScottishPower team as a cybersecurity engineer, a perfect position that allowed me to incorporate my experience and knowledge in cybersecurity with environmentalism, one of my personal passions. I have learned a lot about the world of renewable energy since joining the company and I am confident that it is the sector for me. I am very proud to be working for the UK's first 100% green energy company, knowing that I am doing my bit in safeguarding our operational safety."  

Farzana Kausar 

Cybersecurity Engineer. ScottishPower  

"As Head of Implementation I play a key role in the energy transition, relying on technology to accelerate the electrification of demand in an efficient way. From the team I lead, we manage thousands of operations every day; every 10 minutes we enter a customer's home and execute tens of thousands of installations per year. To address this challenge, digitalisation is a fundamental tool to streamline our processes and to be able to offer our customers a differential value".  

Carmen Burgos García 

Head of Smart Solutions Execution. Iberdrola Customers Spain  

 

Carmen Burgos García 

Head of Smart Solutions Execution. Iberdrola Customers Spain  

 

Iberdrola, committed to gender equality

ODS5

Aligned with SDG 5

Iberdrola is firmly committed to SDG 5, which aims to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.

Mujeres_Wikinger

Acting for effective gender equality

Our goal is to continue moving forward until we establish ourselves as an international model of equality, both inside and outside the company.

Mujer_Aerogenerador

For the empowerment of women

The group is implementing different initiatives in the countries in which it operates to increase the presence of women both within the energy sector and in society.

Mujeres_Tecnicos

We encourage women in STEM careers

Iberdrola carries out numerous initiatives to support the professional development of women and to promote equal opportunities.

Mujer_Tiro_Arco

Diversity and inclusion, a strategic priority

We are working towards the creation of a diverse and inclusive environment in which everyone feels they are represented. An effort that is reflected in our new Diversity and Inclusion and Anti-Harassment Policy.

Bloomberg_Gender_Equality

Bloomberg Gender-Equality Index

Bloomberg acknowledges Iberdrola's commitment to transparency and progress in equal opportunities.

With women in sport

Carolina_Marin

Iberdrola doubles its drive for women's equality through sport by 2022

The Iberdrola group has been promoting women in sport since 2016. They break records, overcome new challenges and, with everyone's support, they are unstoppable.

Premios_Iberdrola_Supera

The Iberdrola Supera Awards

The Iberdrola Supera Awards recognise the people and organisations that both promote and encourage female empowerment through sport.

Tour_Universo_Mujer

Raising awareness of the role of women in sport

Follow the Universo Mujer Tour programmes to learn more about the successes enjoyed by Spanish sportswomen and their stories of effort and achievement.

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Women who made sporting history

Sport has changed throughout history thanks to the milestones reached by women. Some were victims of discrimination, but their fight and their achievements set a precedent and they became an inspiration for many others.

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ALL THE INFORMATION ABOUT

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY

What is International Women's Day and why is it celebrated?

International Women's Day is a day of action aimed at reflecting upon the successes achieved with respect to gender equality and advocating more changes and possible improvements. Furthermore, it is an especially important day for remembering women who have played leading roles throughout history.


How is International Women's Day celebrated?

International Women's Day is celebrated in many countries around the world and in some it is a national holiday. Rallies and demonstrations are held to demand gender equality and the rights of women and girls around the world. The first international women's strike was held in 2017, called by feminist organisations from more than 50 countries to make male violence visible in all its forms (sexual, social, cultural, political and economic). Since then, strikes and general strikes have been held in which women are called to participate in a way that goes beyond merely work-related (care, consumer, student and voluntary organisation strikes) with the aim of showing the important role that such women play in society.


Why is International Women's Day such important?

The struggle for equality and the rights of women throughout the world remains, unfortunately, very necessary. According to the United Nations (UN), no country has managed to achieve gender equality yet. Although unprecedented progress has been made, real change is still very slow and there are still obstacles in the legislation and culture that have yet to be removed. For example, the UN warns that there are legal restrictions that prevent 2.7 billion women from accessing the same labour options as men, while one in three women continues suffering gender-based violence. We are currently also facing a high risk of reversing the achievements already made.


History of International Women's Day

In the wake of the French Revolution, women became aware of their role in the class struggle. As in 1917, with the Russian Revolution, the uprising began with the protests of women against the cost of living. However, despite having marched and fought alongside men, the class struggle did not contemplate the gender struggle, so women began to demand social equality with men. This led in 1791 to the Declaration of the Rights of Woman and the Female Citizen — in response to the Declaration of Rights of Man and of the Citizen of 1789 — which proposed the emancipation of women, equal rights and women's suffrage.

Later, in the mid-19th century, suffrage groups associated with the international labour movement began to emerge, linking the emancipation of women with the struggle of the working class.


How did International Women's Day started? What is its origins?

On 28 February 1909 the first National Women's Day was held in the United States, organised by Socialist Women in honour of the strike by textile workers in 1908 in Chicago and New York. Some 15,000 women marched through New York City to demand a reduction in working hours, better salaries and the right to vote.

The New York Shirtwaist strike, also known as the Uprising of the 20,000, began in November of that year too. Led by Clara Lemlich, it lasted for 11 weeks and managed to reduce the workday to 52 hours per week (before it was between 65 and 75 hours) for both men and women, and establish four days of paid holidays.


Why is International Women's Day held on 8 March?

In 1910, the 2nd International Socialist Women's Conference, held in Copenhagen (Denmark), declared 8 March as International Women's Day, at the proposal of Clara Zetkin. The objective was to promote equal rights, including women's suffrage. The first International Women's Day was finally held on 19 March 1911 in Germany, Austria, Denmark and Switzerland, with rallies attended by more than one million people to demand that women should have the right to vote, to hold public office, to work, to vocational training and to non-discrimination at work.

Less than a week later, on 25 March, a fire was reported at the Triangle Shirtwaist factory in New York. The workers could not escape the fire because the employers blocked the doors to prevent them from going out to take breaks. 123 women and 23 men died. After this carnage, public protests led to major changes in the labour and industrial legislation of the United States.

In 1913, Russia celebrated its first International Women's Day on the last Sunday of February. And in 1914, International Women's Day was celebrated for the first time in Germany, Sweden and Russia on 8 March.

On 8 March 1917, coinciding with International Women's Day, several rallies and demonstrations were held in Russia that had a strong political and economic tone, leading to the uprising that ended the monarchy. That same year, after the October Revolution, the Bolshevik leader Alexandra Kollontai made 8 March a national public holiday and, in 1965, it was declared a non-working day. From that moment on, many other countries started to celebrate this day as a public holiday.


When was the first International Women's Day celebrated?

In 1975 the UN announced 8 March as International Women's Day and celebrated it officially for the first time. Two years later, the UN General Assembly invited all states to proclaim, in accordance with their historical and national traditions, a United Nations Day for women's rights and international peace.

In the United States, International Women's Day wasn't established until 1994.


What are the representative colours of International Women's Day?

The most representative colour is purple. This is the international colour of the equal rights movement and the tone that the American suffragettes adopted as a uniform in the Washington march in favour of the Equal Rights Amendment in 1978.

But the link between feminism and purple dates back much earlier. There is a legend that associates it with the colour of the shirts made by the workers who died in the Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire in 1911. They say that the smoke, which could be seen miles away, was purple.

English suffragettes also adopted purple in 1908, along with green and white. The English activist Emmeline Pethick explained it as follows: "Purple, colour of the sovereigns, symbolises the royal blood that runs through the veins of each fighter for the right to vote, and symbolises their awareness of freedom and dignity. White symbolises honesty in both private and political life. And green symbolises the hope for a new beginning."


What is the symbol of International Women's Day?

The symbol of International Women's Day is the purple bow.